No name

My take on the whole ‘No name’ controversy over on Twitter when an EW reporter called Richard Armitage a ‘ forgettable no name’ actor in a tweet… The way she said all that (and prefers Chris Pine??? Nah, I really don’t see that!) was a little disrespectful but she kinda does have a point because, really, when I tell people in real life that I love Richard Armitage, every single person looks at me blankly… and I really have told quite a few people! Some of these people may even remember I have this favourite actor and they repeatedly ask me, “what was his name again?” So yeah, I do kinda get the ‘no name’ thing, although I too think her criticism could have been worded more tactfully. As for forgettable – I find other actors far more forgettable than Richard, but that’s a personal preference, I guess. To each their own!

richard_2a-20161016

Personally, I can’t be bothered to get that upset over such a thing, or take it too seriously, but then I am quite an even-tempered person anyhow. I read rude tweets like that, have my own thoughts (as voiced above), and then choose to move on because I know arguing on Twitter rarely solves anything. Part of the Armitage Army couldn’t be so complacement and valiantly jumped to Richard’s defence. While I think it’s great some people called her out on her rudeness, I immediately saw where this was headed… Yes, it got ugly quickly, arguments ensued between said reporter and fans and then fans started calling out other fans on their behaviour. In short, mayhem grew over, in my view, a very silly, rude little tweet that never deserved so much attention. But it’s like watching a train wreck, I couldn’t tear my eyes away…  And hey, here I am even blogging about it! Silly me…

Maybe the one good thing to come of all this is that said reporter will at least remember Richard’s name from now on (not forgettable and no name anymore!).

Today, Richard himself has weighed in on Twitter on this whole controversy in the most delightful way!

RA twitter reaction to Dana 01

I love his self-deprecating sense of humour, that man really has been on a roll on Twitter lately! Maybe that’s the best way to respond to rude tweets that can’t be ignored: stay polite, use humour (which can defuse a lot of anger) and move on….

This past weekend, as I watched the drama unfold, I’ve been singing two ‘No name’ songs in my head, over and over again. This one…

and this one:

I went on to do a quick YouTube ‘No name’ song search. Apparently Michael Jackson also made a ‘No name’ song. I’d never heard it before…

And there’s someone who sang an own composition called ‘No name’ on Britain’s Got Talent a few years ago, although those actual words are never mentioned in the song itself…

There’s a song that I didn’t know called ‘No name’ by Ed Sheeran which is also used as the title song to a TV series (The Bastard Executioner) that I also don’t know…

And, oh my goodness, 1980s German pop group Modern Talking (I remember a school friend loving them and hating the ‘Nora’ necklace the singer used to wear) has a ‘No name’ song (which isn’t terribly good but fits into this list):

I think I’m done now, engaging myself in the drama, and yep, I’m ready to move on (after responding to possible comments to this post)… 🙂

34 thoughts on “No name

    1. 😂 😂 I knew my German readers would be able to appreciate this! 😉
      The first two songs on this list are way better, you can distract yourself with that! 🙂

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  1. His reaction was perfect! Self-deprecating andwith his good sense of humour! 👍
    Here’s to the ‘joy’ of social media where people say things they would not dare to express in a real life conversation…
    But, Esther, why, oh why Modern Talking? 😱😂😂😂
    I’m glad there are others too in your playlist! 😘

    Liked by 3 people

    1. Yep. It’s OK to be critical but there’s no reason to be mean about it. Oh well…
      I was shocked to find Modern Talking in my ‘No name’ search results as well! 😂 But I know I have German readers, so I couldn’t resist including them. 🙂 Blast from the past!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Richard’s response was indeed perfect. He has such a droll sense of humour. I’ve seen bits and pieces of this particular Twitter feud & caught myself either rolling my eyes or shaking my head. And kept out of it 😉 He’s a big boy and I think he’s heard worse (though her criticism was extremely poorly worded. Also “give me any Chris”: everything that is wrong with Hollywood in a nutshell) & from this day on she *will* recognize Richard 😅
    Modern Talking???? *kreisch* flashback to the 80s. 😂😂

    Liked by 3 people

  3. Fatima

    I saw the train wreck happening and rolled my eyes. On one hand, she’s 25 and on the other, she’s an adult needing to think before tweeting and got angry because someone did the #RichardArmitage tag. (It’s now a no-no, yet another piece of etiquette that arrived five minutes ago.) Servetus rightfully countered she mentioned the guy by name and would show up in a search. It was exhausting just watching it.

    Liked by 2 people

        1. Fatima

          I looked her up, read her pieces, and suddenly remembered where I have seen her before. She accumulated a few bylines in her short time and ran two parody Twitter accounts, with one securing her a book deal. I agree with this going away as soon as possible. I took one look and thought ‘not worth my time.’ I dealt with personalities like this before IRL.

          Liked by 2 people

        1. Servetus

          This a “thing” now — I’ve read, I think, three memoirs by under-thirties in the last month and in every case, I’ve thought, I bet you will be embarrassed that you published this in twenty years.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. LOL you have such eclectic taste. From where I’m sitting, my life had taken it’s first tack before I was 25. I guess I could have written a memoir in installments.

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            1. Servetus

              Mine had, too, but the point for me is that my understanding of what had happened hadn’t ripened at all. Most of these memoirs are like that — they have a good idea that something important has happened to them, but they are clueless when it comes to self-interpretation.

              re: tastes — I spent twenty years of my life reading sermons and religious texts in early new High German (and secondary literature). I loved every minute of it, but at this point, I am totally ready for something ELSE! Many new elses. As much new else as possible. At least for a while.

              Liked by 1 person

        1. She may not think she has anything to learn (don’t most young people think that, including myself when I was younger?) but I think that what she is experiencing here is that there may be more to learn than she thinks.

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          1. Servetus

            From her tweets today I think she’s feeling like she got what she wanted. There are always consequences to behaviors — but I think it may be quite a while before she realizes it.

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      1. So, is it a no-no to tag someone who’s the subject of tweets? If so, why? Why is it snitching? I can see, maybe, not using the twitter handle @RCArmitage – but otherwise, doesn’t a tweet such as Schwartz’s call for a #RichardArmitage tag?

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        1. Servetus

          This is a fairly complicated question to answer because it relies on a number of variables like how people are reading twitter and who is reading it — but to reduce it down:

          (a) any time you say someone’s name on Twitter whether in a hashtag or with an @ or even without a hashtag, you make it possible for them to find it
          (b) in this case, she didn’t hashtag his name, but in terms of how twitter organizes the searches, “Richard Armitage” and #richardarmitage show up in the same search
          (c) she’s been using Twitter for years, and although they recently split the @’s out from that search (now you have to search @RCArmitage to find people who tag him), it’s inconceivable to me that she didn’t want him to know — or at least should have been aware that he was likely to find out
          (d) in this case, I observed at least two @’s from third parties. One from someone who’s a core fan, one from someone who regularly trolls him. So the @’s came from both directions.
          (e) @’ing someone who had been hashtagged could be seen as snitching but only in the sense that one shared public information with that person, i.e., one was alerting the subject of a public discussion that the discussion was ocurring

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        2. Servetus

          oh, the other thing I meant to mention that’s one of the important variables — Guylty told me once that the blue tick accounts (at least while they weren’t open to the entire world) had a tool where you could filter out mentions according to whether they had a blue tick (making it easier to ignore casual trolls, because their desire for anonymity means that they are unlikely to tell Twitter who they actually are). Schwartz has a blue tick, So it’s possible that he saw the mention himself for that reason. Even if he isn’t using a Twitter client. I’ve kind of gotten away from that myself, but the professional versions of those clients offer all kinds of filtering possibilities that I’m not familiar with.

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          1. Thanks for that explanation, though I still don’t understand why it’s wrong to alert someone with a hashtag that he/she is the subject of a tweet even if the tweeter didn’t tag or @. I would want to know. It doesn’t seem like Chris Pine with a blue check is on Twitter.

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            1. Servetus

              I don’t think it’s wrong either, but you and I have been on the same side of a similar question before, in the summer of 2013. I have no problem with sharing public information that is itself kosher in the first place. However, as a pragmatist, whether I think it’s okay or not doesn’t matter, because it’s inevitable.

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  4. I missed this brew ha ha yesterday as I was spending time with our family….I have no problem with this woman voicing her thoughts, HOWEVER, what I did have a problem with is her vulgar language..Not a prude here by any means, but why must profanity be used at all? I don’t know this lady, sorry, scratch that, person from a hole in the wall and I think it needs to calm down and stop giving her the publicity she seems to desperately crave…I admire RA not only for his acting skill, but because of the person he is as well, and definitely classier than Ms. Schwartz..

    Liked by 1 person

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